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dc.contributor.advisor Kelly, Erin en
dc.contributor.author Di Tommaso, Joanna en
dc.date.accessioned 2016-03-03T19:09:56Z en
dc.date.available 2016-03-03T19:09:56Z en
dc.date.issued 2015-12 en
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10211.3/163072 en
dc.description Thesis (M.A.)--Humboldt State University, Social Science: Environment & Community, 2015 en
dc.description.abstract As a response to global climate change, policies have increasingly incorporated forest carbon offset projects into mitigation efforts. To this end, California has implemented the first US forest carbon offset program within a compliance cap-and-trade system. Improved Forest Management projects allow for the production of forest products while also providing landowners with an alternative revenue stream. Therefore, the inclusion of these projects may have important implications for landowner livelihoods and the health of their forests. Landowners have a variety of motivations for participating within this type of program. However, nonindustrial private forest (NIPF) owner behavior is particularly complex and motivated by multiple objectives, including economic incentives. This research aimed to identify motivations and barriers to NIPF participation within this carbon offset program. Although studies have provided information on landowner behavior within hypothetical markets, this research focused specifically on NIPF participation within California’s newly implemented forest carbon offset program. A mail questionnaire was used to assess NIPF perceptions of forest project requirements. Most respondents were interested in participating in this program in order to receive additional revenue and to improve forest health, regardless of forest ownership objectives. However, participants also identified possible constraints in joining the market, such as the lengthy time commitment, high costs, and protocol complexity. The results of this study contribute to the growing body of knowledge regarding NIPF behavior within incentive-based management programs. en
dc.language.iso en_US en
dc.publisher Humboldt State University en
dc.subject Forest carbon en
dc.subject Offset en
dc.subject Carbon market en
dc.subject NIPF en
dc.subject California en
dc.subject Forest ownership en
dc.title “If someone wants my carbon, let them pay”: examining nonindustrial private forest owner (NIPF) interest in selling forest carbon credits under California’s en
dc.type Masters Thesis en
dc.description.program Environment and Community en


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