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dc.contributor.advisor Gruber, Mary
dc.contributor.author Ewen, Deborah K.
dc.date.accessioned 2019-04-08T19:54:42Z
dc.date.available 2019-04-08T19:54:42Z
dc.date.issued 2003-05
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10211.3/209304
dc.description Thesis (M.A.)--Humboldt State University, Psychology, 2003 en_US
dc.description.abstract The prevalence of autism is continuing to grow and require additional attention and services to the individuals who provide the necessary supports to the child with autism. Supports to caregivers of children with autism through training in strategies of applied behavior analysis may be helpful in increasing caregivers self-efficacy and decreasing stress, while they learn methods of improving the child's behaviors. It is necessary to research effective treatment strategies that will modify behavior, improve support services available to families with autism, and prove to be an effective tool for parents, respite care providers, and professionals. The question this study intended to answer was whether training in applied behavior analysis strategies would decrease caregiver stress in teaching appropriate behaviors and managing inappropriate behaviors, while increasing confidence for teaching appropriate behaviors and managing inappropriate behaviors. This study provided training in applied behavior analysis strategies to six individuals who provide care for children with autism. To measure stress and self-confidence, the researcher developed stress and confidence measures, in addition to a General Self-Efficacy measure. The findings showed the pretest-to-posttest changes in means on each measure to be in the predicted directions, with increases in general self-efficacy and confidence measures, and decreases in the stress measure. But the changes did not reach statistical significance. The results indicated that there were significant relationships between pretest general self-efficacy and how long the participant had provided care for a child with autism, pretest confidence for managing inappropriate behaviors and confidence for teaching appropriate behaviors, posttest stress for teaching appropriate behaviors and relationship to the child, posttest stress for managing inappropriate behaviors and relationship to the child, posttest stress for teaching appropriate behaviors and posttest confidence for teaching appropriate behaviors, and posttest confidence for teaching appropriate behaviors and posttest confidence for managing inappropriate behaviors. The participant's evaluations of the program were very positive. These findings suggest that further training and support to caregivers may lead to decreased stress levels and increased self-efficacy for both teaching appropriate behaviors and managing inappropriate behaviors. This is essential in providing supports to individuals who are responsible for the caring for children with autism and providing a positive learning environment for them. en_US
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Humboldt State University en
dc.subject Applied behavior analysis en_US
dc.subject Autism en_US
dc.subject Behavioral skills training en_US
dc.subject Caregiver en_US
dc.subject Deborah Miller en_US
dc.subject Mary Gruber en_US
dc.subject Parent confidence en_US
dc.subject Parent coping en_US
dc.subject Parent self-efficacy en_US
dc.subject Parent stress en_US
dc.subject Parent support en_US
dc.subject Parent training en_US
dc.subject Parenting skills en_US
dc.subject Siri Ming en_US
dc.title Effects of an applied behavior analysis training program on self-efficacy and perceived stress of parents and care providers for children with autism en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.program Psychology en_US


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