Humboldt Logo

The environment, Christianity, and the Roman Empire: an ecological interpretation

Show full item record

Title: The environment, Christianity, and the Roman Empire: an ecological interpretation
Author: Barker, Amanda Lynn
Abstract: Christianity emerged from the desert periphery of the Roman Empire. The Roman Empire's growth necessitated centuries of imperial conquests, stratification, and extensive resource extraction. The result was widespread state oppression, social injustice, and environmental instability. Christianity responded to the Roman Empire's oppression and domination through political mobilization, social transformation, and ecological restoration. A knowledge that taught ecocentrism, communalism, and material simplicity is revealed in the oral and written tradition of first-century Christianity. To practice Christianity in accordance with the teaching of Jesus was to be inherently opposed to conquest and expansion. In resistance to the anthropocentric and consumerist lifestyle of the Roman Empire, the early Christian community sought to integrate balance into the interaction between the human and the other non-human forms of life.
Description: Thesis (M.A.)--Humboldt State University, Social Science, 2007
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2148/295
Date: 2007-12

Files in this item

Files Size Format View
Amanda.pdf 224.7Kb PDF Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Masters Theses [874]
    A collection of selected Masters Theses in electronic format.

Show full item record

Search DSpace


Advanced Search

Browse

My Account

Statistics

Submit your Scholarship