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The prospect of psychedelic use as a tool in realizing a transpersonal ecology

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Title: The prospect of psychedelic use as a tool in realizing a transpersonal ecology
Author: Lawlor, David
Abstract: Through an examination of key texts and ideas concerning deep and transpersonal ecology; transpersonal psychology; psychedelics; and altered states of consciousness; this thesis explores the prospect for psychedelic use to serve as an effective tool in realizing a transpersonal ecology and developing a holistic relationship with the earth. Discussion of the theory’s implications will focus on the prospect for its acceptance and integration into the mainstream of American society considering its pluralistic nature. In this context, challenges to the theory’s viability will be presented along with ideas for how such challenges might be addressed. Deep ecology is a philosophy that was first developed by philosopher Arne Naess in the late 20th century in resistance to the dominant anthropocentric worldview. Naess stressed the importance of humans achieving a symbiotic relationship with the earth; realizing the unified totality of nature; and asking deep, probing questions about what it means to be a human being living on the earth with non-human beings. Philosopher and ethicist Warwick Fox later refined Naess’ framework, deconstructing the essence of deep ecology, and concluding that Naess’ fundamental notion of deep ecology is best articulated as a transpersonal ecology wherein human beings achieve transpersonal identification with nature and thus form a holistic relationship with the earth. While Fox’s transpersonal ecology is a significant step forward in refining the logic underpinning Naess’ original philosophy, it still fails to answer one vital question: how or by what means might human beings achieve a transpersonal identification with nature and form a holistic relationship with the earth? Addressing this question is the primary concern of this thesis.
Description: Thesis (M.A.)--Humboldt State Univesity, Social Science, 2008
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2148/434
Date: 2008-12

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  • Masters Theses [874]
    A collection of selected Masters Theses in electronic format.

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